With those we love alive… and The Cape… too much for one post!

With Those We Love Alive is a game built to be an interactive storytelling world of a whole new outlook on elit. Gameplay consists of reading and clicking links, with a platform provided by shifting background colors blistering meaningful words. It’s not your typical game that you would think would be played on a game console or phone for instance. This is a game that will have you traveling through a portal created by your own mind and it’s outcome.

Language is everything in this game, and Porpentine uses it to eerie and mesmerizing effect. Caromine, one of many names serves the Empress, a multi-faceted being whose appearance naked bone, spider legs, moth fur, slithering coils is determined by players’ own choices. Although technically a prisoner, Caromine has the run of the palace and city — she can visit a glass and leafbone garden filled with half-sunken statues, meditate by an inky, dead lake, and sip intoxicating potions at the dream. Some of the language usage and word placement seems to be of a weird and ironic kind. But it best served the underlying message the author was trying to portray.

There is a central question to With Those We Love Alive: “Are you part of the world, one with others, a person, or are you alone and apart?” And unlike the game’s other choices, this one has a right answer.wtwla_image8
The Cape:

This piece gave me mixed emotions, I didn’t know whether to prepare myself for an inspiring piece, or a history lesson. Clicking into this bland black and white template that would let me select from nine picture frames. Researching this piece, I didn’t find much but only about the author himself and how he discovered his own life writing this piece. Hitting each square from left to right, and even out of order, just made me frustrated that there was no substance or structure to follow. The images and lack of color gives me a very old feel just like the books I did not want to read back in grammar school. The story is so short and bland that it almost gave me the impression that the author became lazy in the midst of it all. The way he seemed lazy in making it, I felt lazy having to read it. Call me a new soul, but I was eagerly looking for color, character, the climax, a conclusion, SOMETHING! It needed to know this story was going to progressively get somewhere, and that’s what frustrated me the most was that it didn’t.

Image result for the cape by j. r. carpenter summary

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